We must teach a generation who grew up in a fatherless culture the importance of involved fathers in a child’s life

In a society where virtue is withering, we need to keep in mind that fathers are vital and essential.  Without involved fathers our children are severely impacted, and tend to walk indiscriminately in this world without guidance and reassurance. We need involved fathers to step up and lead, become that backbone, guide, and be an example to those within his jurisdiction, his family.

Through fatherhood a child receives instruction and training, encouragement in continual practice in what was instructed, and lastly, affirmation for success in becoming what he or she was raised to become. When a father understands and accepts his God given role in a child’s life; this in fact protects the child from seeking validation and affirmation elsewhere, through different and sometimes diabolical avenues. Truly, if many who had an absent father in their life were to be honest, they would acknowledge an obscure tendency to seek approval from others that most times lead to a life of artificiality.

Encouraging Fatherhood

How can we encourage fatherhood? I believe first, we must teach a generation who grew up in a fatherless culture the importance of involved fathers in a child’s life. Secondly, I believe that we must remind a culture that fathers are essential to the family core, and the successful development of a child. And lastly, I believe that we must recognize and acknowledge the honor in which a man holds who is labeled, and functions as an involved father.

Now, I’m not attempting in any way to minimize the importance of a mother in a child’s life, however I am asserting that a father is needed just as much as a mother within the child’s life. Therefore, to encourage fatherhood is to correctly define what a father is, the role and function of a father in the home, and amidst his children’s life.

As the Director of Men’s Ministry at Daybreak Ministries I oversee the ministry that provides intervention and attention to male clients, while bringing awareness to the role and function of the father. I encourage our mentors to challenge the men we consult to be involved in the lives of their children. We advocate for dual parent homes in which the father and mother are married, or are planning marital arrangements in the near future. We recognize that being an involved father is much more successful when the mother and father are linked together in marriage working as one. My position allows me to aid in saving lives and families by standing firm on the biblical principles regarding marriage, family, and even gender roles for man and woman as father and mother.

Successful Fatherhood

I had the blessing of being raised in a dual parent home in which my father took much time to train me, as well as my younger brother and sisters in the ways of life. During our growth and development, we had many setbacks and pitfalls, and he was always there to correct, discipline, and advise us while giving us encouragement. He taught us right from wrong, and developed a standard that we were to follow and emulate that he stated would allow us success in life. When we did well, he validated us and affirmed us to the point that when someone came against what we were doing as a family we always stated, “my daddy likes it” and continued on our way.

This is in fact what I pass down to my children – an atmosphere of continual training, continual encouragement, and continual validation to the point that they will not seek after what I failed to give them in a world that denounces morality.

Fathers are important because God the Father is most important, even amid a society that minimizes His function and influence within the family nucleus. Our ultimate example of how to act, and function as a father is God, the Father of fathers, the standard and measuring stick of pure fatherhood. Through God’s example in scripture a father should give his child instruction and training, encouragement in continual practice in what was instructed, and lastly, affirmation for success in becoming what he or she was raised to become from the fathers training.

Fathers are the teachers, and our children are our disciples. Therefore, we must recognize that if the teacher is absent, the students are left to teach themselves. In conclusion, as Paul states to the church in Thessalonica, “As ye know how we exhorted and comforted and charged every one of you, as a father doth his children” (1 Thes 2:11). We fathers are to make it our mission to do the same as involved fathers.

Ashton Wine

Ashton Wine

Director of Men's Ministry for Daybreak Ministries

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