South Carolina Cultural Indicators 2019: Vital Statistics

Population

Population Growth in South Carolina and the United States

From 1960 to 2017, South Carolina’s population increased 110%, from 2.4 million to 5.0 million, making it the 23rd largest state in the Union.[1] At the same time, the population of the entire United States increased 82%, from 179.3 million to 325.7 million.[2] 

In 2017, the largest age group in South Carolina was 20-29 years old (13.7% of the population), followed by those 50-59 years old (13.4%), the 10-19 age group (12.7%), and those between 60-69 years of age (12.4%).[3] During the same year, South Carolina’s population was about 66% white (3.2 million), 28% black (1.3 million), and almost 2% Asian (77,200). Hispanics of any race comprised almost 5% of the state’s population (243,900).[4]

After accounting for births and deaths, approximately 43% of the population growth in South Carolina from 2010 to 2017 was the result of international migration.[5] 

As of 2010, South Carolina’s population density of 153.9 persons per square mile is 76% greater than the national average (87.4 persons per square mile).[6]


 

References

[1] U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, “Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico, April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017 (NST-EST2017-01).” December 2017. Available at www2.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest/tables/2010-2017/state/totals/nst-est2017-01.xlsx. Access verified Oct.6, 2018.  Some state data from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, South Carolina Community Assessment Network (SCAN), “Population (1990-2017).” Oct.6, 2018. Available at http://scangis.dhec.sc.gov/scan/bdp/tables/populationtable.aspx.  Access verified Oct.6, 2018. 

[2] Ibid. 

[3] American Fact Finder, U.S. Census Bureau, “Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States, States, Counties, and Puerto Rico Commonwealth and Municipios, April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017, Table PEPAGESEX,” June 2018. Available at https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=bkmk. Access verified Oct.7, 2018.  

[4] American Fact Finder, U.S. Census Bureau, “Annual Estimates of the Resident Population by Sex, Age, Race Alone or in Combination, and Hispanic Origin for the United States and States: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017, Table PEPASR5H,” June 2018. Available at https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=PEP_2017_PEPASR5H&prodType=table. Access verified Oct. 7, 2018.

[5] American Fact Finder, U.S. Census Bureau, “Estimates of the Components of Resident Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017, Table PEPTCOMP,” Mar. 2018. Available at https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=PEP_2017_PEPTCOMP&prodType=table. Access verified Oct. 7, 2018.  

[6] U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, “Quick Facts: South Carolina.” Available at www.census.gov/quickfacts/sc. Access verified Oct. 7, 2018.

Components of Population Change

Ratios of Annual Births to Deaths, and White to Non-White Populations: 1980-2016

In 1980, there were about 2.1 births for every death in South Carolina, compared to about 1.8 births for every death in the nation. Since then, birth-to-death ratios across the nation have dropped to the point that as of 2016, there were only 1.2 births for every death in South Carolina, and 1.4 births for every death nationwide.[7]

In 1980, almost 86% of all Americans were white. By 2016, that number had declined to 77%.  Put another way, the ratio of white to non-white populations declined from 6.12 in 1980 to 3.33 in 2016.[8] 

Since 1980, South Carolina has witnessed a modest increase in its ratio of white to non-white population (2.7%). This may be due to the presence of a large non-white population already present in the state (31% in 1980; 30.5% in 2016).[9] 


 

References

[7] Recent national data from Joyce A. Martin, Brady E. Hamilton, Michelle J.K. Osterman, Anne K. Driscoll, and Patrick Drake, “Births: Final Data for 2016, Supplemental Tables.” In National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol 67.1. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, Jan. 31, 2018. Available at www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_01_tables.pdf. Access verified Oct. 7, 2018. Additional state and national data from American Fact Finder, U.S. Census Bureau, “Annual Estimates of the Resident Population by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States, States, and Counties: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017, Table PEPSR6H,” June 2018. Available at https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=PEP_2017_PEPSR6H&prodType=table. Access verified Oct. 7, 2018. Other national birth rate data from Joyce A. Martin, Brady E. Hamilton, Michelle J.K. Osterman, Sally C. Curtin, and T. J. Mathews, “Births: Final Data for 2013.” In National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol 64.1. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, Jan. 15, 2015. Available at www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf. Access verified Oct. 7, 2018. Most state data (1990-2016) from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, South Carolina Community Assessment Network (SCAN), “Births (1990-2017).” Oct. 7, 2018. Available at http://scangis.dhec.sc.gov/scan/bdp/tables/birthtable.aspx.  Access verified Oct. 7, 2018. Other data from U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012 (131st edition), “Table 6: Resident Population by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin Status,” and earlier editions. Washington, DC, Feb. 9, 2018. Available at www2.census.gov/library/publications/2011/compendia/statab/131ed/tables/12s0006.xls?#.  Access verified Oct. 7, 2018.

[8] Ibid.

[9] Ibid. 

Birth Rates

Birth Rates Per 1,000 Persons

Since 1960, South Carolina’s birth rate has fallen from 25.1 per 1,000 persons in 1960 to 11.6 per 1,000 in 2016, a decline of almost 54%. From 1960 to 1983, South Carolina’s birth rate was above the national average; since then, it has been below it for 30 of the past 33 years.[10] Nationally, the birth rate fell from 23.7 per 1,000 persons in 1960 to 12.2 in 2016, a decline of 49%.[11]

In 2017, an estimated 68,074 pregnancies occurred in South Carolina, or about 70.5 per 1,000 females age 15-44. Of these, 57,030 (83.7%) resulted in births; 395 (0.6%) died before birth; and 10,649 (15.6%) were aborted.[12] In the same year, approximately 5,521 births (9.6%) were low-weight births (birth weights of less than 2,500 grams / 5 pounds, 8 ounces).[13]


 

References

[10] Ibid.

[11] Ibid.

[12] South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, South Carolina Community Assessment Network (SCAN), “Pregnancy (1990-2017).” Available at http://scangis.dhec.sc.gov/scan/pregnancy/input.aspx.  Access verified Oct.8, 2018.

[13] South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, South Carolina Community Assessment Network (SCAN), “Births (1990-2017).” Oct. 7, 2018. Available at http://scangis.dhec.sc.gov/scan/bdp/tables/birthtable.aspx.  Access verified Oct. 7, 2018.

Death Rates

Crude and Age-Adjusted Death Rates Per 1,000 Persons

In 2016, 48,151 people died in South Carolina, for a crude death rate of 9.7 persons per 1,000 population. Since 1960, South Carolina’s death rate has increased 1.4%. During the same time, the national death rate has fallen 16.8%, from 9.5 to 8.5 in 2016.[14]

Age-adjusting a rate is a way to make fairer comparisons between groups with different age distributions. For example, a county with a higher percentage of elderly people may have a higher rate of death than a county with a younger population merely because the elderly are more likely to die. The same distortion can happen when comparisons are made between races, genders, or time periods. Age adjustment can make the different groups more comparable.[15]

When the 2016 death rates for South Carolina and the nation are age-adjusted, the state’s death rate decreased to 8.3, while the national rate dropped from 8.5 to 7.3.[16]

In 2016, the crude death rate for whites in South Carolina (10.3) was 17% higher than that of blacks (8.8). However, when age-adjusted death rates are compared, blacks die at a higher rate (9.4) than whites (8.0).[17] 

Heart disease was the primary cause of death in both South Carolina and the nation. In 2016, South Carolina’s age-adjusted death rate from heart disease was 173.8 per 100,000 population, 8.3% higher than the national average (165.5).[18] The second-leading cause of death in South Carolina and the United States was cancer (167.7 per 100,000 population) and is 7.6% higher than the national average (155.8).[19]


 

References

[14] Most state data from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, South Carolina Community Assessment Network (SCAN), “Deaths (1999-2016).” Oct. 8, 2018. Available at http://scangis.dhec.sc.gov/scan/bdp/tables/death2table.aspx. Access verified Oct. 8, 2018. Most recent national data (2016) from Kenneth D. Kochanek, Sherry L. Murphy, Jiaquan Xu, and Elizabeth Arias, “Mortality in the United States, 2016,” National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief, No. 293. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, Dec. 2017.  Available at www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db293.pdf.  Access verified Oct. 8, 2017. Older national data from Sherry L. Murphy, Jiaquan Xu, Kenneth D. Kochanek, Sally C. Curtin, and Elizabeth Arias, “Deaths: Final Data for 2015,” In National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 66.6. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, Nov. 27, 2017. Available at www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_06.pdf. Access verified Oct. 8, 2018.

[15] State of Missouri, Department of Health and Human Services, “Age-Adjusted Rate.” Available at https://health.mo.gov/data/mica/CDP_MICA/AARate.html. Access verified Oct. 8, 2018.

[16] South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, South Carolina Community Assessment Network (SCAN), “Deaths (1999-2016).” Oct. 8, 2018. Available at http://scangis.dhec.sc.gov/scan/bdp/tables/death2table.aspx. Access verified Oct. 8, 2018.

[17] Ibid.

[18] Jiaquan Xu, Sherry L. Murphy, Kenneth D. Kochanek, Brigham Bastian, and Elizabeth Arias, “Deaths: Final Data for 2016,” in National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 67.5. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, July 26, 2018. Available at www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_05.pdf. Access verified Oct. 8, 2018.

[19] Ibid.

Infant Mortality

Rates Per 1,000 Persons

Since 1960, infant mortality rates in South Carolina and the United States have fallen 80% and 77%, respectively. In 1960, 34.4 out of every 1,000 babies born in South Carolina died within their first year of life. By 2016, that number had dropped to only 7 of every 1,000 babies born.[20]

Despite this progress, South Carolina’s infant mortality rate remains above the national average. In 2016—the most recent year in which detailed state information is available—South Carolina (8.6) had the thirteenth highest infant mortality rate in the nation.[21]

South Carolina’s still-unsatisfactory infant mortality rate is largely the product of teenage pregnancies, which are more likely to produce low-weight, at-risk babies, and a lack of adequate prenatal care. In 2016, the infant mortality rate in South Carolina for babies whose mothers received inadequate prenatal care (11.6) was 3.6 times higher than that of infants of mothers who received adequate prenatal care and manifested no known risk factors (3.2).[22]


 

References

[20] State data from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, South Carolina Community Assessment Network (SCAN), “Infant Mortality (1989-2016).” Available at http://scangis.dhec.sc.gov/scan/mch/infantmortality/input.aspx. Access verified Oct. 8, 2018. National data from Jiaquan Xu, Sherry L. Murphy, Kenneth D. Kochanek, Brigham Bastian, and Elizabeth Arias, “Deaths: Final Data for 2016,” in National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 67.5. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, July 26, 2018. Available at www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_05.pdf. Access verified Oct. 8, 2018.

[21] Ibid.

[22] Ibid.